Paway (previously called Descuajaringado-The Upside down Town)
  Kuxan Suum / estrellata
  Cuando tu te hayas ido (When you have departed)
  Caminata y Sentata
  Enredados tus hijos (Entangled your Sons)

  Flipeography is a multidisciplinary project that involves the arts of choreography/dance, photography and animation. It presents short dance pieces through photographic sequences that are mounted in a perpendicularly to the wall as opposed to flat against it, as if they were flipbooks.
Since they are very close together, the viewer is able to see the movement while passing his/her finger through the sequence of pictures. This time Barragan joins the her art and creativity with San Francisco -based photographer Jeff Braverman, Ecuadorian composer Nelson García, who gave her the idea of mounting an exhibition with it, and Mexican visual artist Antonio Alvarez.
Choreography is an art that involves decision-making while using time and space, and its media is the human body. In Flipeography these three elements are altered from their original context and they are controlled by the viewer. The bodies are still human, but they are not live performers.

Guest Artists:
Antonio Alvarez Morán is a Mexican visual artist whose first exhibit was held in 1975. In 1982 he graduated from Universidad de las Americas-Puebla, where is currently faculty in the Arts Department. He received an MA from Texas Christian University in painting, in 2000. Here he also taught and developed his theory on ¨"magic gringuism". He has exhibited his work individually, collectivelly, and collaborated in multidisciplinary work in Mexico and abroad. He works in Cholula SigloVeintiúnico Institute and has two kids.

Jeffrey Braverman is an American based in San Francisco artist who concentrates in portraiture and photojournalism. Some of his clients and publications include Time, Newsweek, Esquire, Forbes, Bikini Magazine, Asia Inc, Far Eastern Economic Review, San Francisco Focus, Seattle Magazine, Wired, Microsoft. He graduated from the Pratt Institute of Arts and Design in 1989, and has exhibited his work at the Seattle Children's Museum as well as in several galleries in San Francisco and Ecuador. He was photography teacher at San Francisco University from 91 to 93.

Fritz Boonzaier is an art director for film and television, currently based in Seattle. He has been working in the industry since 1984, and has been involved in various projects in Nova Scotia, West Virginia, Buenos Aires, Vancouver, Seattle, Los Angeles, Victoria, and Portland. He first collaborated with Barragán in Flipeography, as the industrial designer and videographer for the exhibit pieces. In addition to his work as an art director, he applies his skills in artifact and building restoration to large performing arts projects. He also sculpts, does scenic art and is working on two screenplays.